• Folly One, Drawing, back 2014
  • Folly One, Drawing, back 2014
  • Folly One, Drawing, 2014
  • Folly One, Drawing, 2014
Cosmological models help us speculate upon a conceptual order of reality. Different historical epochs give rise to systems of spatial representations that cohere with the modes of thinking of the culture in which they were formulated. The Renaissance explored the concept of a closed, geocentric universe through perspective; the Baroque dealt with the idea of a dynamic, infinite, heliocentric universe through anamorphosis; the romantic period had the picturesque folly as a model to understand dissolution. Modernity investigated the concept of a machine like universe through axonometric drawing.

I make parallels between cosmological models and architectural representation. Working with the materials and tools of the architect—squares, triangles, pencil, ink and Mylar--, I create hybrid drawings that expose the mental ‘slippages’ and illusions that dispel the fallacy of appearances. I use mirrors to set visual paradoxes like binocular rivalry, the goblet/face illusion, etc.


Looking at the baroque as the last ‘late’ model that dealt with change and uncertainty similar to now, I borrow devices like the picturesque folly and perspective boxes to reinterpret these tropes of representation anew. I am intrigued by the questions that today’s cosmology raises, particularly the role of the observer in quantum events. Ultimately, the work proposes a new mechanism for seeing that reveals a new perceptual experience of space.


www.alexandraschoenberg.com

Built with Apostrophe